AuthorHannah Wallen

Hannah has witnessed women's use of criminal and family courts to abuse men in five different counties, and began writing after she saw one man's ordeal drag on for seven years, continuing even when authorities had substantial evidence that the accuser was gaming the system. She is the author of Breaking the Glasses, written from an anti-feminist perspective, with a focus on men's rights and sometimes social issues. Breaking the Glasses refers to breaking down the "ism" filters through which people view the world, replacing thought in terms of political rhetoric with an exploration of the human condition and human interactions without regard to dogmatic belief systems. She has a youtube channel (also called Breaking the Glasses), and has also written for A Voice For Men and Genderratic. Hannah's work can be supported at https://www.minds.com/Oneiorosgrip

We have to talk about the bear | An HBR production

W

I didn’t want to do this, because I feel like this meme has already been mauled to death by angry feminists, and the people who responded to their blatant statements of prejudice. That’s probably why I put it off until it was pretty much going to be labeled an afterthought, but the more discussion I’ve seen and heard on the bear vs man topic, the more I realized this has to be done.…

What about gender roles during the American revolution? | HBR Talk 309

W

In our timeline of the historical context around the evolution of suffrage in countries influenced that had been English colonies, whose systems were influenced by the English parliamentary system & English common law, we have reached the American Revolution, and have been discussing what voting looked like at that time.…

What does suffrage history look like? | HBR Talk 307

W

Over the last 2 weeks, as part of the context related to the development of suffrage in nations influenced by the English parliamentary system, we delved into the related history of gynocentrism, by discussing the difference between gynocentrism, and gynocentric culture, reading an article on the subject from Peter Wright’s reference site, gynocentrism.com.…

How did gynocentric culture come about? | HBR Talk 305

H

Last week we discussed how biologically different women were from women today in ancient times when we didn’t have the luxury of tools to do all of our hard manual labor around the home. We learned that physical evidence in the bones of men and women indicated that historically, women’s arms endured much more mechanical loading than women of today, and the average woman likely had arms stronger...

Are women the weaker link? | HBR Talk 304

A

Show notes In discussing the history of male suffrage and its link to the history of male military obligation, I realized there’s an aspect of this history we’re not talking about. In today’s political debates we’re told that historically, patriarchal attitudes kept women out of military service and many other harsh realities of life; dirty jobs like coal mining, dangerous work like hunting...

Listen to Honey Badger Radio!

Support Alison, Brian and Hannah creating HBR Content!

Recent Posts

Recent Comments

Archives

Categories

Tags

Meta

Follow Us

Facebooktwitterrssyoutubeby feather